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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
haven't seen any political progress here. >> right. and mohamed, let me ask you this. let's talk act the first piece of damage we may see, which we saw during the debt ceiling debate, the idea that the u.s. gets its credit rating hurt again. there's been some talk about it from fitch. the net result of lowering the u.s.' credit rating the last time around and-in the debt debacle, it's kind of sad because the first experience most people have with that is it wasn't as bad as we were warned it was going to be. is there a real danger to the u.s.' debt rating and what could that mean? >> at some point, there was a danger. the reason why we haven't felt it is because we've been doing better than rest of the world. this concept that my colleague, bill gross says, wear the cle cleanest dirty shirt. so we're not clean but we're cleaner than europe is right now. >> right. >> so we haven't felt it. my main worry is the following, that if the republicans and democrats can't get together to solve the fiscal cliff you will need an external force, a major market sell-off, you will need a major eco
reduction package. >> mohammed aladarin is the ceo of pimco and mark zandy is a chief moist at moody's analytics and joining me in studio is christine romans. the gdp for the u.s. grew at 3.1% over the summer. that's more than double the rate of the previous quarter. you can see the chart, it's been choppy, but it looks like we're going in the right direction. america's economy is gaining pace, doing better than expected. and we've been saying the 2013 could be the year of a real economic renaissance in the united states or at least the beginning of one. talk to me about the consequences to our prosperity if washington doesn't reach a deal. >> the consequences are not good. so what the numbers are telling you is that the private sector is healing. and if the private sector were left to its own devices, it would heal faster. unfortunately, washington is getting in the way. and what we find out this week, ali, is that the problem is not just a lack of trust between democrats and republicans, we found out that the republicans themselves can't unite. which means that the cooperative solu
to strike anywhere. now, russia says syria is taking steps to keep them safe. mohammed joins me from beirut. what exactly is syria doing. >> good morning, ra ndi. >> he says that syria has started moving its chemical weapons from various sites across the country and consolidated into one site. safe guard these weapons and make sure they don't fall in the hands of the wrong people. there were a lot of concern about this over the last few months. russia is taking this syria and trying to make sure these weapons don't fall into the wrong hands. the u.s. administration, as well as many other countries said for the last few weeks and the last few months if syria used chemical weapons that would be a red line and suffer severe consequences because of it, randi. >> are the weapons still a threat to the rebels? >> well, the rebels maintain that the weapons are a threat to them and a threat to the general population to syria. they said that they believe assad and his regime would result to utilizing those weapons. we should add, though, that the regime said on many occasions that they don't have che
professors and towns leaders and spreading it throughout. since mohammed can come to mohammed, the mountain goes to mohammed, right? and also the whole notion that in china and india where there's a tremendous amount of university research parks being bit and created, terry you talked about the labs that are built and ready to go. it's worse then that, isn't it? they're offering super star professors double the salary, everything they want plus if you're in the medical field any type of clinical testing want to do to make sure your elements get going because they have different laws then we do. my question is if there's a technology drain, it's also in terms of u.s. laws, we only prohibit certain type of technology drains. that has to do with national security and technology. but when you talk about in steve's case the talent of the innovative things that basically get sucked out along with that, that's something going sort of -- nobody talks about that. >> it's true. what you're saying is true. goes back to what you were saying before. other countries are stepping up efforts to be a magnet
pat managed to win over not only the ragged women in a morobe and salt market but also sultan mohammed who granted her an unprecedented formal audience. her goal she told them was to convince people we enjoy being here and are generally interested in them. as it was not the only one to see the importance and her role. by the time the soviet trip, the last of their vice presidential ones, pat ambassador of goodwill had one of her -- and nric times calling her a diplomat in high heels. the report described her as self-possessed, self-made, orderly and precise. the capitol press club, an organization of african-american news correspondents, presented her with an international relations aboard in 1957, recognizing quote or goodwill at tiffany's among people of eight african countries end quote h.s. or as america's outstanding asset -- investor goodwill. deputy attorney general william rogers wrote to pat during a trip to europe which he had them bombarded i heard requests. he praised her significant role in public affairs. bolivar responsibilities a second lady that travel might only fulfi
, this is in cairo. it was there last night that supporters and owe points of president mohamed morsi clashed. they hurled rocks and molotov cocktails at each other. at least five people were killed, hundreds injured. the root of the violence is what many believe is morsi's grab for power. ian lee joins us this morning. what's happening right now. >> reporter: we have the elite republican guard, the people tasked with protecting the president. they are putting up barbed wire and road blocks, diverting traffic and people away and trying to keep the two sides, the pro-morsi and the anti-morsi protesters away from each other. last flight we saw thousands of pro-morsi supporters camp outside of the presidential palace, that is after they went there and removed, by force, the anti-morsi protesters. but now we have a small -- protests are planned for today against morsi and their plan to defe descend, again, on the presidential palace. >> a direct constitution has been approved and egyptians are scheduled to vote on it next week. is there something in this proposal that has protesters so angry? >>
of the approximated, mohammed morsi continued. overnight, he increased tough economic reforms as part of a proposed $4.8 billion imf loan agreement. eyeman is in eye row with the latest. >> reporter: good morning to you. it has added more to the political turmoil here today. today there are several messages being sent to morsi. the referendum is scheduled for saturday. it's a controversial constitution that secular liberal forces here have announced it doesn't protect human rights or the rights of minorities and women. there are supporters of the president and they are, too, organizing their rallies for today and friday. and against all of this, the president has given the egyptian military law enforcement powers. that means they are essentially now allowed to act as the country's police force in the run up to the referendum. they're allowed to arrest civilians and that has caused a great deal of alarm for human rights advocates and organization ones. so it's a great time of uncertainty here in egypt. right now, the opposition is calling for roadway injection of the referendum. they're not calling for
for deeper cuts. and demonstrators acting in anger to president mohammed morsi's continued push on an islamist backed constitution. and in the streets of cairo demanding that vote scheduled for this coming saturday be canceled and many in the u.s. concerned about religious freedom during this unnecessary. i'm harris falkner and now, back to huckabee. [applause] >> detroit is broke. and detroit is in big trouble. officials there are trying to figure out just how the city can avoid being the largest american town ever to declare bankruptcy. and joanne watson, counsel woman came up with the quote of the week. >> and after the election of jimmy carter, coleman young went to washington, d.c. he came back home with bacon. that's what you do. that's what you do. and our people in an overwhelmingly they supported rehe election of this president and there ought to be a quid pro quo and you ought to exercise leadership on that. not just that, but why not? >> yeah, why not? i mean, let's just ahead and quid pro quo, why is that a problem? it's illegal to make a promise if you vote for a c
to the streets to protest egyptian president mohamed mursi's effort to hold a referendum vote later this month after asserting wide- ranging powers, protecting him from judicial oversight. egyptian forces fired tear gas at protesters, some of whom broke through lines to approach the president. the rally coincided with a one- day strike from newspapers. the united nations is warning food shortages are growing in syria as a result of rising prices and mounting attacks on un vehicles delivering supplies. the u.n. world food program is currently feeding one, 5 million people in syria, the vast majority displaced from their homes. the news comes after the u. n announcing they are cutting back and removing staffers from damascus. among the latest victims of violence in syria, nine students and a teacher were killed when their school was bombed in damascus. government forces have blamed rebels for the attack. nato has approved a request by turkey for the deployment of patriot missiles to its border with syria. turkey sought the missiles to defend itself from cross border violence. speaking in belgium
been marred of late thanks to mohamed morsi, the president of egypt earning him the moniker on atwitter of morsilini or mubarak with a beard, and now as we look around, we are not sure where this revolution is going and nor are we aware were the of the revolutions are going around the region. syria is teetering, georgia is burning, and the future is yet to be written. the question now is in all these countries will there be elections, will the islamists win? will it be one man, one vote or one-man, one-vote, one time. so with that we are going to debate the motion of democracy is the triumph in the middle east, it's up about box and is unavoidable and essential. we will have five minutes of opening remarks from each of our panelists today. we will start with ruel again to the good and go to brian and have q&a for myself as well as the audience and our panelists will be allowed to minutes at the end to restate their case and he essentially persuade you to believe what they believe. we will start now with ruel. ruel, you may begin. >> this is that such an angle. ruel, i'm confident you wi
about several things. first of all, all concerning president mohammed morsi and this growing perception that he is making himself too powerful. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. >> opposition factions back protesting against mohammed morrissey for nearly two weeks. most of the protests have been limited to tahrir square, but they're now going to the source of their anger, president morrissey, and his presidential palace. >> why come here? >> because it's -- we got fed up. >> he doesn't respect us. he don't want to listen to our demands. >> reporter: what's your message to him by coming out here? >> that what he is doing is completely unfair. this is not what we asked for. it's complete dictatorship. >> reporter: at one point there were tense moments when protests clashed with police and broke through a police barrier, but things called down pretty quickly. the president in no danger. he left at some point. the protests continue empassioned but peaceful. there you hear the chants of dictator, dictator. like much of egypt, most of these people are muslims, but you'll also find the moderates,
, almost looking at quarters. mohamed el-erian from pimco said he was worried about the third quarter reporting season because there was a finite about about what companies could do from the top and they had to focus on the top line. so in october, however, we saw a bit of a recovery from q3. and our flash figures were 2%, 2.5% in october. we have not told the market what we did in november, but it was better than october. and so we've ended up, you know, towards the end of november, after november, up by 3%, a little bit more than 3%, actually. >> yeah. >> and december, we have to wait and see. because we get another attack he of quarter-itis, so you have to be very careful. >> any lessons to be learned at all? is anything to go going to be next year than what it was? >> caution prevails. we have these gray swans, the unknown unknowns. we don't know what's going to happen. but the known unknowns are clearly the eurozone we're talking about, which will muddle through. china ma had soft landing. brics had a soft landing. the third area is in the middle east which you know a lot about,
instead of looking at calendar years almost seemed to be looking at quarters. mohamed el-erian said he was worried about the reporting season because there was a finite number of what companies could do in terms of cost. a number of companies missed the top line forecast, not so many the bottom line as the top line. so in october, however, we saw a little bit of a recovery from q3. and our flash figures were 2% and we did 2.5% in october. we have not told the market what we did in november, but it was better than october. and so we've ended up, you know, towards the end of november up by 3%, a little bit more than 3%, actually. and december, we have to wait and see. >> i've seen that you're continuing the plans in china and in particular from what i can tell. >> absolutely. >> are you going to try and diversify them further? >> well, if i do have any regrets -- and i've had a few over the years that i'm willing to admit publicly -- it would be that we didn't have enough of our operations in britain and that we didn't have enough in asia and latin america, africa and the middle east and
. >> as mohamed el-erian said, it's the new normal. nothing is going to happen next year in all probability. there will be the italian electrics. if berlusconi starts to poll better in a run up to the italian elections, which i think will happen, then you're likely to see bonds markets reacting a little bit to that. that could cause problems in the spanish and italian yield curve. so maybe that would that will trigger mariano rajoy asking for a bailout. anything which happens on the policy front, anything which happens in the next few months is going to be weighed for its impact on the election prospects come next september. >> you're lucky because we have a whole lot more europe after the break. we can continue to talk about all things european. but of all of this talk about the cliff, if it hasn't sent you over the edge yet, head on to our website and take the cliff quiz. see if you can match the right quiz with a number of things in. >> you can also take a look at what's on the agenda today in the u.s. a couple of economic reports wrap up the week. both due out at 10:00 a.m. eastern. the
are true even if mohamed morsi believes them. and one of those things is that there are a lot of old regime people around that have been really working to bring him down from the inside. even paranoids have enemies. he's a deeply paranoid guy right now. but he also is facing a lot of internal enemies. the overwhelming sense i had, mika, from being in egypt is how little the people there know each other. they have a blue states/red states problem that makes ours look like a day at the beach. and that's really -- as the lid has come off and you have these less religious brotherhood people and middle and upper class people from cairo and alexandria, these people do not know each other at all. this country really needs to go on a long weekend retreat. >> yeah, i don't think that's going to happen. you know, we saw the same thing, interestingly enough, in 2009 in iran where you had a lot of people in the cities opposing ahmadinejad, and you had people in more rural areas being far more conservative and supporting ahmadinejad. but carl bernstein, one of morsi's biggest problems right now is we lo
mohamed morsi is wrapping up the pressure against the country's new draft constitution. they've gathered in the tens of thousands to speak out against what they call another power grab by morsi and his allies. the demonstrators are occupying tahrir square in cairo. they say the voting on the draft wasn't fair. they argue the council is dominated by those who support president morsi. >> translator: we will never be forced to approve the constitution. >> translator: the draft constitution does not represent the will of all egyptians. >> members of the council unanimously approved the draft constitution friday after an all-night session. egyptians will soon be able to vote on it in a referendum. they've already staged protest against morsi over the past week. they're angry they halted court challenges. a temporary step until the new constitution and parliament are created, he said. >>> anti-government forces in kuwait are also raising their voices. tens of thousands of opposition supporters are protesting against a parliamentary election that's set for saturday. opposition politicians are a
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)